Top news

Verizon, T-Mobile both rank best and worst among global 5G operators

Verizon, T-Mobile both rank best and worst among global 5G operators

by  Bevin Fletcher |  May 20, 2020 Network testing results by multiple companies have told a similar story when it comes to U.S. operators varying approaches to 5G: Verizon’s 5G using millimeter wave spectrum is super-fast, but signals can be hard to find because of the short-range distance. Meanwhile, competitor T-Mobile’s low-band 5G has great coverage helped by its far reaching 600 MHz spectrum but with less capacity speeds are more akin to 4G LTE service.   New analysis from Opensignal has now put that narrative on a global scale, comparing 5G performance of 10 operators across four countries that moved early to deploy 5G. In addition to U.S. operators including AT&T and Sprint (who is now being absorbed by T-Mobile), results look at South Korea’s LG U+, SK Telecom, and KT; Australia’s Telstra; and U.K. operators EE and Vodafone. The results? Beating out the nine other operators for fastest average 5G download speed with 506.1 Mbps: Verizon. Rounding out the bottom of the list with the slowest average 5G download speed of 47 Mbps: T-Mobile. Verizon's mmWave 5G speeds significantly outpaced carriers at home and abroad, though it’s the only one that exclusively uses high-band frequencies. Except for T-Mobile, AT&T ranked behind all other 5G operators in terms of download speeds. However, there’s the matter of availability, which as Opensignal’s Ian Fogg wrote in the analysis, “is equally important” as speed. “There is little point in having the potential to enjoy 5G, if that 5G experience is not often available,” Fogg wrote.   The operator whose users spend the most time connected to 5G with nearly 20% availability: T-Mobile. In last place for 5G availability among global operators, as you may have guessed: Verizon, with 5G availability at a mere 0.5%. Except for T-Mobile, AT&T is the only other operator on the list that used low-band 850 MHz for its 5G rollout. AT&T ranked behind all other 5G operators other than T-Mobile in terms of download speeds, with 62.7 Mbps, and in the middle of the pack at sixth for 5G availability. Notably, the results give an indication of what industry groups and U.S. operators themselves have been calling for – the need for access to more mid-band spectrum. Mid-band is often considered the sweet spot for 5G because it delivers higher capacity and speeds, but signals can travel and penetrate better than high-band mmWave. International operators in the analysis have all deployed 5G using mid-band spectrum. South Korea initially launched 5G last year around the same time as the first U.S. deployments, and the country’s three major carriers had a strong, consistent results. LG U+ and SK Telecom took either second or third while KT ranked fourth both in terms of speed and availability. 5G availability was close to that of T-Mobile for South Korea's operators: SK (15.4%), LG U+ (15.1%), KT (12.6%). Speed was well below Verizon's mmWave, but considerably faster than that of AT&T and T-Mobile: LG U+ (238.7 Mbps), SK Telecom (220.6 Mbps), KT (215 Mbps).  “South Korea continues to demonstrate not only tremendous 5G adoption, but a widely available and fast 5G experience,” wrote Fogg. U.K's Vodafone and EE clocked 122.1 Mbps and 149.8 Mbps for average 5G download speeds, just behind Telstra at 157 Mbps. The U.K. and Australia operators' 5G availability was still well above Verizon, but ranked below all others on the list: EE (6.1%), Telstra (5.9%), Vodafone (4.4%).  U.S. carriers plan to use a combination of low-, mid-, and high-band spectrum for 5G and have already invested billions for mmWave licenses at recent spectrum auctions. Progress on mid-band has been slower, though the first mid-band auction is slated for July and will offer Priority Access License (PALs) in the shared CBRS 3.5 GHz band. An auction for C-Band spectrum is planned for December. Still, in March the industry group CTIA, citing a study by Analysys Mason, said that even with action on the C-Band and 3.5 GHz band, the U.S. needs to effectively double its licensed mid-band spectrum availability to keep pace with other nations leading in 5G. Sprint was the only U.S. operator deploying mid-band spectrum so far, and those 2.5 GHz assets are being integrated into the new T-Mobile since the carriers’ merger deal closed April 1. “We expect to see the average 5G speed of new T-Mobile users rising as they benefit from the mid-band 5G spectrum which Sprint has deployed,” Opensignal said in its analysis. Updated to include additional results from non-U.S. operators. 

BT picks Ericsson for 4G, 5G core, replacing Huawei

BT picks Ericsson for 4G, 5G core, replacing Huawei

by  Linda Hardesty | Apr 15, 2020 12:17pm   BT, along with the U.K. government, has been a bit resistant to remove Huawei equipment from telecom networks. But the British government has been under a lot of pressure from the United States to cut Huawei out. As a compromise, U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson decided in January that Huawei gear must be removed from the nation’s core network. Huawei can supply gear for the country’s 5G radio access networks, but it will be restricted to a 35% cap in the RAN. Today, BT said it has chosen Ericsson to deploy a cloud native, container-based, mobile packet core for 4G and 5G services. Ericsson’s dual-mode 5G Core will be deployed on BT’s Network Cloud. “Having evaluated different 5G core vendors, we have selected Ericsson as the best option on the basis of both lab performance and future roadmap,” said Howard Watson, BT’s chief technology and information officer, in a statement. “We are looking forward to working together as we build out our converged 4G and 5G core network across the UK." The 5G Core from Ericsson will also advance BT’s goal to move to a single converged IP network. And the 5G Core will help BT to create new services such as enhanced mobile broadband, network slicing, mobile edge computing and vertical industry support. In Ericsson’s announcement today, the vendor said the containerization of core network functions will enable BT to benefit from greater industry innovation in areas such as automation, orchestration, network resiliency, security and faster upgrade techniques.   There’s a general trend in the data center world to move from virtual machines to containers. And telcos are beginning to jump on this trend as well.  RELATED: Rakuten’s 5G network will be built with containers Rakuten just commercially launched its new greenfield 4G network in Japan. But the operator is already working on transitioning its network to 5G, and it plans to use containers, rather than VMs, for its network functions virtualization (NFV) infrastructure as well as part of its RAN. BT and Huawei Earlier this year, BT said it expected the removal and replacement of Huawei equipment in its networks to cost it about $658 million over five years. With today’s announcement that it’s transitioning to a new core with Ericsson, it appears BT is on track to get Huawei out of its core by the U.K. government’s deadline of January 2023. In a recent conversation with Neil McRae, BT’s managing director and chief architect, he said, “Of the telecom vendors available to BT, Ericsson and Nokia are fantastic partners. We also use Huawei, also a fantastic partner. But we feel like we need more choice and capability.”

GSMA to discuss possible cancellation of Mobile World Congress MWC 2020 Barcelona

GSMA to discuss possible cancellation of Mobile World Congress MWC 2020 Barcelona

Telecoms lobby GSMA will hold a board meeting on Friday to discuss the possible cancellation of the Mobile World Congress (MWC) in Barcelona after several big-name withdrawals because of the coronavirus outbreak, an industry source said on Tuesday.   MWC 2020, scheduled to take place on Feb. 24-27, is the telecoms industry's biggest annual gathering, with companies spending millions on stands and hospitality to fill their order books. The world event was put in jeopardy after the coronavirus outbreak, which has killed more than 1,000 people so far, mostly in mainland China, prompted U.S. technology and telecoms heavyweights such as Cisco Systems Inc, Sprint Corp and Facebook Inc to pull out.   A number of companies ranging from Japan's NTT Docomo and Sony Corp to U.S. chipmakers Intel Corp and Nvidia had already dropped out of the four-day international telecoms conference that draws in more than 100,000 visitors. Adding to the concerns over the impact of the epidemic, the World Health Organization (WHO) warned earlier on Tuesday of a global threat potentially worse than terrorism. A cancellation of the event would be a big blow for Catalonia's capital city. The congress usually gives a $500 million lift to the local economy as delegates throng to the Fira trade fairgrounds, wine and dine contacts and criss-cross Barcelona by taxi.   GSMA, which represents 750 operators and another 350 firms in the mobile industry ranging from Germanys Deutsche Telekom to China's Huawei, hosts the congress. Its board is composed of 26 leaders of some of the world's biggest telecoms groups and is currently chaired by Stephane Richard, the CEO of Orange, France's biggest phone company. In the event of a full cancellation of the event, the financial liability for the organisers may depend on whether the Spanish government changes its health advice on the coronavirus. Spain's health minister Salvador Illa told reporters on Tuesday that there is no public health reason for the event not to be carried out. Illa added that additional health measures related to the MWC could be announced on Wednesday. GSMA did not respond to requests seeking comment.

China just launched the world's largest 5G network

China just launched the world's largest 5G network

China just launched the world's largest 5G network By Sherisse Pham, CNN Business  Updated 1351 GMT (2151 HKT) November 1, 2019 Hong Kong (CNN Business)China just switched on the world's largest 5G network. The country's three state-run telecom operators launched services for the next generation wireless technology on Friday. China Mobile (CHL), China Telecom (CHA) and China Unicom (CHU) are all offering 5G plans that start at 128 yuan ($18) for 30 GB of data per month, giving Chinese internet users access to the ultra fast service. 5G commercial services are now available in 50 cities, including Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou and Shenzhen, according to Chinese state news agency Xinhua. In Shanghai, nearly 12,000 5G base stations have been activated to support 5G coverage across the city's key outdoor areas. Other countries including the United States and South Korea launched 5G services in select areas earlier this year. But China's commercial network is the biggest, according to Bernstein Research, giving the county more influence over the technology's global evolution. "The scale of its network and the price of its 5G services will have a pivotal impact throughout the supply chain," Bernstein analyst Chris Lane said in a research note earlier this week. China has more mobile internet users than any other country, with about 850 million people using their smartphones to surf the internet, according to Xinhua. Analysts at Jefferies predict that China will have 110 million 5G users — about 7% of the country's population — by 2020. South Korea launched its 5G network in April, and roughly 3% of the country's internet users subscribe to it, according to Jefferies. Huawei's role Huawei, the world's largest telecommunications equipment maker and a leading smartphone brand, is playing a major role in China's 5G network rollout. The Shenzhen-based company does business with all three Chinese telecom operators. China Mobile, the country's largest mobile internet provider, awarded nearly half of its 5G networking contracts to Huawei, according to state run newspaper China Daily. The rest went to rivals such as Ericsson (ERIXF), Nokia (NOK) and ZTE (ZTCOF). Huawei has been under pressure from a US campaign against its business. Washington has been urging countries to ban Huawei equipment from their 5G networks, alleging that Beijing could use it for spying. Huawei denies any of its products pose a security risk. Despite the pressure, Huawei has found customers for its 5G products. The company said in an earnings report earlier this month that it had signed 60 commercial 5G contracts with carriers around the world, beating out rivals Ericsson and Nokia. Smartphone sales Several Chinese smartphone makers have already started selling 5G devices in China. But Huawei is in pole position to dominate the market, "given its tight operator relationships in 5G network deployment, and control over key components," according to Nicole Peng, an analyst with research firm Canalys. Peng said in a research note on Wednesday that local rivals including Oppo, Vivo and Xiaomi will "find it very hard to make any breakthrough." CNN's Yong Xiong contributed to this story.  https://edition.cnn.com/2019/11/01/tech/5g-china/index.html

Promotional products

MaxComm 4G LTE Router & WLAN WR-106

MaxComm 4G LTE Router & WLAN WR-106

Model : WR-106
MaxComm 4G LTE Router & WLAN WR-106.